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The Brave Redoutable by Ivan Berryman. (AP)


The Brave Redoutable by Ivan Berryman. (AP)

Already ravaged by incoming shot from the combined French and Spanish fleets as she approached the enemy line, HMS Victory found herself under intense attack from the French 3rd Rate 74-gun Redoutable. The two ships became entangled, grappling irons went across and the most terrible artillery battle commenced. Admiral Lord Nelson was fatally wounded by a shot from the Redoutables mizzen top before it was brought crashing down. Now the British three-decker, the 98-gun Temeraire appeared outboard of the Redoutable and began pouring further shot into her, the little French ship dwarfed by two mighty British vessels. But still she fought on, refusing to strike her colours. Of all the ships at Trafalgar, Redoutable sustained the highest casualties with 478 killed and 81 wounded. Depicted from left to right are HMS Temeraire, Redoutable and HMS Victory.
Item Code : DHM1519APThe Brave Redoutable by Ivan Berryman. (AP) - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs.

Image size 26 inches x 16 inches (66cm x 41cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£70 Off!
Supplied with one or more free  art prints!
Now : £140.00

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FREE PRINT : Battle of Trafalgar by Ivan Berryman

This complimentary art print worth £30
(Size : 12 inches x 7 inches (31cm x 18cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

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Other editions of this item : The Brave Redoutable by Ivan Berryman.DHM1519
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 200 giclee art prints. Image size 26 inches x 16 inches (66cm x 41cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£70 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!
Supplied with one or more  free art prints!
Now : £110.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Small limited edition of 20 artist proofs. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£20 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £50.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTSmall signed limited edition of 50 prints. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£20 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £40.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman
on separate certificate
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£600.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman
on separate certificate
£90 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £370.00VIEW EDITION...
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by Ivan Berryman.

SOLD
Size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Ivan BerrymanSOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
Extra Details : The Brave Redoutable by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
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I regard my painting of the French 74-gun two-decker Redoutable at the Battle of Trafalgar on 21st October 1805 as being among the best paintings I have ever done. It is dark and dramatic and epitomises the horrors of the war at sea during the Napoleonic era. But it also stands to symbolise the gallantry and sheer dedication of one ships crew, even when faced with impossible odds. The Redoutable was the third ship astern of Villeneuves flagship the Bucentaure and was therefore placed precisely between the two interception points where Nelsons Victory and Collingwoods Royal Sovereign cut through the Franco-Spanish line at the start of the battle. Under the command of Captain Jean-Jacques Lucas, the Redoutables crew were regarded by many as the most disciplined and efficient in the fleet. Aware that his small ship would not win an artillery battle alone, he had trained his men to specialise in small arms fire and grenade throwing. Having devastated the Bucentaure with her opening broadside, Victory found herself coming under intense fire from the French Neptune and the Redoutable. Victorys Captain Hardy made the decision to engage one of the two ships at close quarters and, not surprisingly, chose the Redoutable because she represented the smaller opponent. At about 13.10, the two ships came together, their huge wooden hulls grinding against one another, their yards and rigging becoming entangled. At once, the French crew threw grappling irons and lashed the ships together whilst, on the lower decks, Redoutables lower gun ports were ordered to be closed to prevent the British from boarding through them. Now Victory opened an intense broadside at point-blank range, firing double and treble-shotted rounds into the little French ships hull. Redoutable, in response began to put Captain Lucas plan into action, pouring musket fire and grenades onto Victory from markmen positioned in Redoutables fighting tops and rigging. It was at this point that Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson fell, mortally wounded from a sniper on Redoutables mizzen top. By now the two ships had drifted, still locked together, into the path of the British three-decker Temeraire, which now fouled the starboard side of the Redoutable. Now she, too, began pouring fire into the little French ship. Trapped between these two giants, the Redoutable would have been forgiven for striking her colours, but she fought gallantly on, despite taking terrible casualties. So great was the danger of Redoutable bursting into flames and becoming an uncontrollable inferno, that British gun crews began throwing buckets of water into the French vessel to douse the fires. At one point, a British boat crew was even welcomed aboard the French vessel through a stern port to help fight the fires that raged, before returning to their own ship to continue the fight. By now, the sky was black with gunsmoke and the air acrid and difficult to breathe. Still, the Redoutables crew fought on although, by now, both Victory and Temeraire had reduced their gunfire into her for fear of hitting each other through the utterly gutted lower decks of the French vessel. Finally, Victory broke away and limped into the drifting smoke. Despite the British flagships size and firepower, she played little part in the rest of the battle due to the terrible punishment that she and her crew had taken from the Redoutable. Temeraire, too, managed to free herself, but was now engaged with the Fougueux. Indeed, for a while, all four ships had been alongside each other. As Victory drifted away, the Redoutables main and mizzen masts fell, the latter crashing onto the deck of the Temeraire, forming a bridge between the two ships across which the French made many an attempt to board the British three-decker and were repeatedly repelled. Captain Lucas was himself wounded in the battle, but now took time to assess his ships condition. She was completely dismasted, missing all her steering gear and sternpost. Her sides were staved in and her poop and stern destroyed. She was taking in water and was burning fiercely. Only now did Lucas make the decision to reluctantly strike, which he did at 2.20pm to the Temeraire. Of her 643 crew, 300 were dead and 222 injured. This gallant little ship was taken in tow after the battle, but such was the damage sustained that she finally sank at about 10.00pm that evening, going down with most of her wounded still aboard. My painting depicts the very height of the battle as the Redoutable finds herself wedged between the huge bulk of Victory (on the right of the picture) and Temeraire (to the left) The damage that was visited upon each ship is evident in this painting. Victory herself had suffered terrible damage as she had approached the enemy line without herself firing a single shot and was in some difficulties even before encountering the Redoutable, whose gallant crew did so much to repel her bigger opponent. I can think of few examples of so vigorous and determined a defence in the face of such overwhelming odds as the fight that the little Redoutable put up on that fateful day. And I simply had to paint it.
Ivan Berryman.

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