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The Brave Redoutable by Ivan Berryman. (AP)


The Brave Redoutable by Ivan Berryman. (AP)

Already ravaged by incoming shot from the combined French and Spanish fleets as she approached the enemy line, HMS Victory found herself under intense attack from the French 3rd Rate 74-gun Redoutable. The two ships became entangled, grappling irons went across and the most terrible artillery battle commenced. Admiral Lord Nelson was fatally wounded by a shot from the Redoutables mizzen top before it was brought crashing down. Now the British three-decker, the 98-gun Temeraire appeared outboard of the Redoutable and began pouring further shot into her, the little French ship dwarfed by two mighty British vessels. But still she fought on, refusing to strike her colours. Of all the ships at Trafalgar, Redoutable sustained the highest casualties with 478 killed and 81 wounded. Depicted from left to right are HMS Temeraire, Redoutable and HMS Victory.
Item Code : DHM1519APThe Brave Redoutable by Ivan Berryman. (AP) - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs.

Image size 26 inches x 16 inches (66cm x 41cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman70 Off!
Supplied with one or more free  art prints!
Now : 140.00

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FREE PRINT : Battle of Trafalgar by Ivan Berryman

This complimentary art print worth 30
(Size : 12 inches x 7 inches (31cm x 18cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

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Other editions of this item : The Brave Redoutable by Ivan Berryman.DHM1519
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 200 giclee art prints. Image size 26 inches x 16 inches (66cm x 41cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman70 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!
Supplied with one or more  free art prints!
Now : 110.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Small limited edition of 20 artist proofs. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman20 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 50.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTSmall signed limited edition of 50 prints. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman20 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 40.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman
on separate certificate
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!600.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman
on separate certificate
90 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 370.00VIEW EDITION...
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by Ivan Berryman.

SOLD
Size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Ivan BerrymanSOLD
OUT
VIEW EDITION...
Extra Details : The Brave Redoutable by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
About all editions :

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I regard my painting of the French 74-gun two-decker Redoutable at the Battle of Trafalgar on 21st October 1805 as being among the best paintings I have ever done. It is dark and dramatic and epitomises the horrors of the war at sea during the Napoleonic era. But it also stands to symbolise the gallantry and sheer dedication of one ships crew, even when faced with impossible odds. The Redoutable was the third ship astern of Villeneuves flagship the Bucentaure and was therefore placed precisely between the two interception points where Nelsons Victory and Collingwoods Royal Sovereign cut through the Franco-Spanish line at the start of the battle. Under the command of Captain Jean-Jacques Lucas, the Redoutables crew were regarded by many as the most disciplined and efficient in the fleet. Aware that his small ship would not win an artillery battle alone, he had trained his men to specialise in small arms fire and grenade throwing. Having devastated the Bucentaure with her opening broadside, Victory found herself coming under intense fire from the French Neptune and the Redoutable. Victorys Captain Hardy made the decision to engage one of the two ships at close quarters and, not surprisingly, chose the Redoutable because she represented the smaller opponent. At about 13.10, the two ships came together, their huge wooden hulls grinding against one another, their yards and rigging becoming entangled. At once, the French crew threw grappling irons and lashed the ships together whilst, on the lower decks, Redoutables lower gun ports were ordered to be closed to prevent the British from boarding through them. Now Victory opened an intense broadside at point-blank range, firing double and treble-shotted rounds into the little French ships hull. Redoutable, in response began to put Captain Lucas plan into action, pouring musket fire and grenades onto Victory from markmen positioned in Redoutables fighting tops and rigging. It was at this point that Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson fell, mortally wounded from a sniper on Redoutables mizzen top. By now the two ships had drifted, still locked together, into the path of the British three-decker Temeraire, which now fouled the starboard side of the Redoutable. Now she, too, began pouring fire into the little French ship. Trapped between these two giants, the Redoutable would have been forgiven for striking her colours, but she fought gallantly on, despite taking terrible casualties. So great was the danger of Redoutable bursting into flames and becoming an uncontrollable inferno, that British gun crews began throwing buckets of water into the French vessel to douse the fires. At one point, a British boat crew was even welcomed aboard the French vessel through a stern port to help fight the fires that raged, before returning to their own ship to continue the fight. By now, the sky was black with gunsmoke and the air acrid and difficult to breathe. Still, the Redoutables crew fought on although, by now, both Victory and Temeraire had reduced their gunfire into her for fear of hitting each other through the utterly gutted lower decks of the French vessel. Finally, Victory broke away and limped into the drifting smoke. Despite the British flagships size and firepower, she played little part in the rest of the battle due to the terrible punishment that she and her crew had taken from the Redoutable. Temeraire, too, managed to free herself, but was now engaged with the Fougueux. Indeed, for a while, all four ships had been alongside each other. As Victory drifted away, the Redoutables main and mizzen masts fell, the latter crashing onto the deck of the Temeraire, forming a bridge between the two ships across which the French made many an attempt to board the British three-decker and were repeatedly repelled. Captain Lucas was himself wounded in the battle, but now took time to assess his ships condition. She was completely dismasted, missing all her steering gear and sternpost. Her sides were staved in and her poop and stern destroyed. She was taking in water and was burning fiercely. Only now did Lucas make the decision to reluctantly strike, which he did at 2.20pm to the Temeraire. Of her 643 crew, 300 were dead and 222 injured. This gallant little ship was taken in tow after the battle, but such was the damage sustained that she finally sank at about 10.00pm that evening, going down with most of her wounded still aboard. My painting depicts the very height of the battle as the Redoutable finds herself wedged between the huge bulk of Victory (on the right of the picture) and Temeraire (to the left) The damage that was visited upon each ship is evident in this painting. Victory herself had suffered terrible damage as she had approached the enemy line without herself firing a single shot and was in some difficulties even before encountering the Redoutable, whose gallant crew did so much to repel her bigger opponent. I can think of few examples of so vigorous and determined a defence in the face of such overwhelming odds as the fight that the little Redoutable put up on that fateful day. And I simply had to paint it.
Ivan Berryman.

This Week's Half Price Art

 HMS Illustrious slips quietly away from the docks at Devonport, Plymouth with the Fiji class cruiser in the middle distance, 1941.

HMS Illustrious and HMS Kenya at Devonport by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - 75.00
At 12.30pm on the 21st of October 1805, Admiral Lord Nelson on board his flagship, HMS Victory, breaks the line of the combined French and Spanish fleets.  The Victory is delivering a devastating stern rake to the 80 gun French ship Bucentaure, the flagship of the combined fleets, commanded by Vice-Admiral P. C. J. B. S. Villeneuve.  Starboard to the Victory is the 74 gun Redoutable.  This ship, the Victory and HMS Temeraire, seen left, became locked together soon after, the unequal exchange resulting in the Redoutable having the highest casualties during the entire battle.

Breaking the Line at the Battle of Trafalgar by Graeme Lothian. (AP)
Half Price! - 75.00
The nuclear-powered submarine HMS Repulse (S23) manoeuvres in preparation to berth at HMS Dolphin in Portsmouth harbour in the late 1970s.

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Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 300.00

 The submarine depot ship HMS Maidstone is pictured off Hong Kong with a quintet of British submarines alongside for replenishment, namely (left to right) an S-class, a U-class, a T-class and two more U-class.

HMS Maidstone by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - 450.00
HMS Ark Royal after a recent refit, rejoins the fleet in 2001.

HMS Ark Royal by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - 25.00
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Deutschland Passing Through the Kiel Canal by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - 25.00
 Type 21 frigate HMS Ambuscade (F172) is shown passing the swing bridge as she enters Taranto Harbour.

HMS Ambuscade by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - 25.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

Johnny Herbert is shown in the Benetton B195.  Herbert took a deserved victory at his home British Grand Prix at Silverstone, beating the Ferrari of Frenchman Jean Alesi into second place by more than 16 seconds, and ahead of fellow briton David Coulthard in the third placed Williams.  He also claimed victory at the Italian Grand Prix at Monza.  Along with Michael Schumachers nine victories, Herbert  helped Benetton win their first constructors championship in the 1995 season.  The Formula One Benetton B195 was designed by Rory Byrne and Ross Brawn for use in the 1995 Formula One season by Benetton.  The B195 was almost identical to the B194 but for a change of engine supplier from Ford to Renault V10 engine, the same type the rival Williams team was using.  With his first two Formula One wins under his belt in 1995, Johnny Herbert won just one more race, winning at the Nurburgring at the European Grand Prix in 1999, racing for Stewart Ford.  He retired from Formula One in 2000.

Johnny Herbert/ Benetton B.195 by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - 40.00
Monte Carlo - June 1st 2003 and Juan Pablo Montoya put in an outstanding drive, pushing his Williams BMW to victory in the Monaco Grand Prix. His triumph in what is possibly the most prestigious race of the season allowed him to celebrate his first win since Italy in 2001.

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Half Price! - 82.50
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Half Price! - 50.00
B43. Damon Hill/ Williams Renault FW.18 by Ivan Berryman

Damon Hill/ Williams Renault FW.18 by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - 40.00

This Week's Half Price Military Art

 The men of the US 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment ambushed the German 1st Battalion, 6th Fallschrimjager Regiment making their way to Carentan, the Battle of Hells Corner ensued.

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Half Price! - 300.00
 Lieut-Colonel W, Scott, the Kings (Liverpool) Regiment leads his men from the first glider, during operation broadway.

Chindits landing at Broadway, Burma, 5th / 6th March 1944 by David Rowlands (Y)
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Half Price! - 30.00
 Central Russia, 4th-12th July 1943. For Operation Citadel the Heavy tank battalion 503 was split into separate companies and attached to various panzer divisions. Rubbels 1st company went to 6th Panzer Division, and as such take part in the epic breakthrough on the 10th and 11th which came close to the collapse of the soviet southern front!

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Half Price! - 80.00

This Week's Half Price Aviation Art

 Hypothetical engagement, Soviet airforce MIG19 shoots down a USAF RB47 Stratofortress during the 1960s.

Cold War Gone Hot by David Pentland.
Half Price! - 35.00
 Squadron Leader H C Sawyer is depicted here flying his 65 Sqn Spitfire Mk.1a R6799 (YT-D) in the skies above Kent on 31st July 1940 at the height of the Battle of Britain. Chasing him is Major Hans Trubenbach of 1 Gruppe, Lehrgeschwader 2 in his Messerschmitt Vf109E-3 (Red 12) . The encounter lasted eight minutes with both pilots surviving.

High Pursuit by Ivan Berryman. (D)
Half Price! - 100.00
 Even the most faithful of Messerschmitt Me 109 pilots that also flew the Focke-Wulf Fw190 grudgingly admitted the well-proportioned and aesthetically pleasing Fw190 was the finest single-seat fighter in the Luftwaffes armoury during World War II. Soon after its arrival on the Channel Front in 1941, when initial bugs were ironed out, this superb fighter came close to fighter design perfection by the standards of the day. Just as the Mk IX Spitfire held the mantle as Britains most outstanding combat fighter of the war, so was the Fw190 regarded by experienced Luftwaffe pilots. Within months of its operational debut the Fw190 was causing widespread consternation among RAF pilots, the new fighter equal to the Mk IX Spitfire in all but its ability in the tightest of turning circles. By 1944 the technically superb Fw190 came into its own in the great air battles against the USAAFs massed daylight raids. The defence of the Reichs western airspace rested on the shoulders of a few Jagdgschwarden who, against steadily increasing odds, were tasked with interception and destruction of the attacking American heavy bombers. Flying alongside the two established Channel fighter wings JG2 Richthofen and JG26 Schlageter, equipped with Fw190s and led by the great fighter ace Oberst Walter Oesau, JG1 joined the battle in defence of northern Germany. Nicolas Trudgians painting Storm Chasers depicts the Fw190As of I./JG1, distinguished by their distinctive black and white striped cowls, scrambling from the snow-covered Dortmund airfield on 10 February 1944 to intercept another inbound American daylight raid. Nicks dramatic view of this technically supreme fighter conveys its true class as it hurtles over the airfield, its undercarriage retracting as the Fw190 accelerates into the climb. Below, sharing the airfield with I./JGI, are the Fw190s of the newly formed Sturmstaffel 1, identified by their black-white-black tail bands, seen taxiing out to join in the interception. Despite bad weather conditions the Luftwaffes defending fighters scored heavily that day, inflicting severe losses on the Americans, claiming 29 bombers and 8 fighters shot down in the action.

Storm Chasers by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - 110.00


Prelude by Geoffrey R Herickx. (Y)
Half Price! - 25.00

 

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